Wednesday, June 03, 2015

Committing to a Yoga Practice: Finding a Teacher

preference for a yoga teacher
By: Virginia Iversen, M.Ed

Committing to a Yoga practice takes a certain degree of dedication, self-love and a visionary ability to see a better future for you. Committing to a Yoga practice also takes time; just like a bud of a flower takes time, patience and the right amount of nourishment to slowly unfurl and bloom into a beautiful flower. Additionally, committing to a regular practice of Yoga takes a daily dedication to spending a certain amount of time on the mat. 

Many of us commit to a regular Yoga practice when we experience how beneficial performing a full, balanced series of postures, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques on a daily basis is for both our physical and mental health. Practicing several times a week if it is not possible to practice on a daily basis can also experience many of these benefits. However, practicing Yoga for 1 to 2 hours at a time, a couple of times of month, will not net you the same positive results. 

The body and the mind take time to unwind, relax and regenerate. By practicing a balanced series of Yoga postures, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques at least several times a week, your body and mind will be deeply restored and rejuvenated. You will also be able to maintain and improve your muscular strength and flexibility. In addition, by keeping your body fit and healthy, you will be less likely to sustain injuries while pursuing other athletic or outdoor activities. 

One of the first steps to truly committing to a regular Yoga practice, and growing in that practice, is to find a teacher who can teach you the fundamental aspects of correct alignment and sequencing during a class or personal practice. The teacher whom you choose will be highly individual for most people. Some students prefer a very challenging, active sequence of Power Yoga postures, while other students prefer a restorative practice. Your particular preference for a teacher and a style of Yoga will most likely depend on your current state of physical health and on your current life circumstances.



For instance, if you were pregnant, it would be optimal for you to look for a certified, prenatal Yoga instructor with whom you feel an affinity. On the other hand, if you are training to run a half marathon, you may prefer to find an instructor who leads more physically challenging classes, which will increase your muscular strength and physical flexibility in preparation for the race ahead. If you are contending with a serious or chronic illness, you may find that seeking out a Yoga instructor, who is well-versed in managing chronic, long-term illnesses with a therapeutic practice of postures, breathing exercises and stress relief techniques, will suit your personal needs more optimally. 

In the process of choosing a Yoga teacher, you also want to be sensitive to your own interpersonal dynamics with the various teachers you meet. You may find that some teachers are easier for you to relate to than other instructors. If it is important for you to have a teacher with whom you can speak on a personal level or ask questions, it is advisable for you to take some time and look for a Yoga teacher who is approachable and willing to fully answer your questions. 

There are many different teachers and styles of Yoga classes from which to choose. You may find that is it is the most advantageous for you to alternate the type and duration of class in which you participate on a weekly basis. In other words, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, you may find it to be extremely helpful to take a Power Yoga class that is both physically challenging and emotionally detoxifying. In contrast, on Sunday afternoon you may find that it is very relaxing and deeply restorative to engage in a Yin style class that emphasizes longer holds and supported, restorative postures. 

Naturally, when you alternate the type of Yoga class in which you participate, you will also alternate taking classes with different teachers. By visiting a variety of studios and health clubs, you will be able to experience different styles of Yoga, as well as different teaching styles of the various instructors. This will enable you to find the best teacher, or combination of teachers, for your particular needs and individual life circumstances, which will help you to solidify and maintain your commitment to a regular Yoga practice over the long run. 

Virginia Iversen, M.Ed, has been practicing and studying the art of Yoga for over twenty years. She lives in Woodstock, New York, where she specializes in writing customized articles that are 100% unique. She is currently accepting Yoga and health-related writing orders and may be contacted at: enchantress108@gmail.com

© Copyright 2015 – Virginia Iversen / Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division


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2 comments:

parvezbdjsr said...

In the process of choosing a Yoga teacher, you also want to be sensitive to your own interpersonal dynamics with the various teachers you meet. Thanks for posting this good article.

Mary Wilson said...

Yoga instructor, who is well-versed in managing chronic, long-term illnesses with a therapeutic practice of postures, breathing exercises and stress relief techniques, will suit our personal needs more optimally. Thanks for sharing this informative article.