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Saturday, June 25, 2022

What Type Of People Should Take Yoga Teacher Training Online?

Yoga Teacher Training Online


By Faye Martins
Many people opt to become yoga instructors, oftentimes by taking yoga teacher training online. However, there are many yoga students who have considered undergoing teacher training, but aren't sure if this career path is right for them. While there is certainly a difference between a student who's passionate about yoga and a full-fledged instructor, both share a passionate interest in yoga, meditation and advancing their practice. To help determine whether or not teacher training is right for you, here are some of the qualities that make for a good yoga instructor.

Someone Who Lives and Breathes Yoga - If you wake up in the morning and the first thing you think about is heading off to a class, then you might just be a perfect candidate for teacher training. Yoga teachers share a deep and universal love for their practice. They say that those who do what they love will never work a day in their lives. If yoga is your passion, a career as an instructor could be perfect.





Someone Who Wants To Help People - In the media, yoga has gotten the reputation of being nothing more than a mere workout. However, passionate yogis know that this is simply not the case. Yoga has been known to treat a wide array of physical and psychological ailments, from depression to physical injuries to insomnia and more. Those who feel that it is their calling to help people would be happy in a position as a yoga instructor. As a teacher, you'll not only help your students to advance their practice, but to deal with issues that they have been struggling with in their lives.

Someone Who Wants To Own a Studio - Many yogis harbor the not-so-secret dream of someday owning their own studio. While some studio owners don't have their certification, the vast majority do. By having your teacher certification, you'll be a better studio owner. You'll have a good understanding of what makes a great teacher and also have the option to potentially teach a few classes on your own.





Someone Who Wants To Deepen Their Practice - Not everyone who takes teacher training online is completely positive that they want to switch careers and become an instructor. Sometimes, enthusiastic yogis enroll in instructor training for the simple reason that they are ready to deepen their practice and get a better understanding of yoga. Even if you aren't sure that you want to become a teacher full-time, investing in teacher training will help you to expand your practice and become a better yogi.

Teacher training can be invaluable to a wide array of yogis. Even if you aren't positive that you are ready to become a full-time instructor, passionate yogis often find that teacher training programs help them to improve their own practice and get a better understanding of the deeper meaning of yoga. For those who are ready to definitely become yoga instructors, teacher training is the crucial first step towards beginning your new journey as an instructor. By devoting your life to yoga, you'll gain a sense of peace and joy that all novice yogis aspire to obtain. Namaste.
© Copyright – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Are you an experienced teacher looking for YACEP credits or continuing education?

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The YOGA MIND: 

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Want to learn more about how to become a certified yoga instructor or practicing yoga as a form of therapy? Please feel free to use the resources on the right side of this page for research.




Tuesday, March 22, 2022

Why Practice Yoga With Pets?

why practice yoga with pets
By Sangeetha Saran, CYT 500

Are there any benefits for humans and their pets practicing yoga together? Is pet yoga just a fly-by-night fad for people in search of the latest thing? Are yoga and meditation good for pets and humans together?

Combine Your Daily Yoga Practice with Pet Exercise


If you have a pet, then it is easy to combine your asana practice with animal exercise at home or in a specialized class that includes cats or dogs. After you return home from work, you may want to use yoga movements to relax, but if your dog needs a walk, then there is not much time left for a routine. Fortunately, there are experts who have designed yogic methods that are good for pets and people.






Create a Pet-friendly Yoga Routine to Use At Home


When your dog or cat has been home alone all day, it may also feel stressed due to the lack of physical activity. You might arrive home to find that your dog has been barking all day, or perhaps, your cat has sat by the window looking out until you return. Some animals display hostility after being alone for many hours, but you can bond with a cat or dog with a specialized yoga routine.

Incorporate Your Pets Into Your Yogic Practices


You might think that performing yoga sequences with a pet is not possible because animals cannot get into most of the positions, but the secret is that you can incorporate a cat or animal into a yoga routine. For instance, if you are sitting in a lotus pose, then you can place a small dog or cat in your lap, and while you are meditating, your pet will also become calmer and more relaxed.






Yogic Methodology Can Help an Animal Relax


If you have had a pet for several years, then it will notice when you are angry. Some dogs or cats will cuddle up to you when you are having a difficult day, but other pets will begin to act out by becoming more anxious or destructive. With the right types of yoga postures, a pet that avoids being held may relax and permit more hugs and pats. Sometimes, asana practice or meditation attracts your pet to calmly sit beside you and tune in.

Join a Class That Includes Yogic Methodology With Pets


As a pet owner, you might avoid participating in yoga classes because it requires leaving your cat or dog home alone again, but you can find a teacher who teaches classes that include pets. In many cases, these classes take place at local parks, making it easy to enjoy learning new asana postures and movements while also providing essential exercise for a pet. 




© Copyright – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

To see our selection of Online Yoga teacher training courses, please visit the following link.

https://www.aurawellnesscenter.com/store/

Are you an experienced teacher looking for YACEP credits or continuing education?

Subscribe to Our Newsletter for Special Discounts and New Products

Related Resources

The YOGA MIND: 

52 Essential Principles of Yoga Philosophy to Deepen your Practice 

by Rina Jakubowicz

RESTORATIVE YOGA FOR LIFE

A Relaxing Way to De-stress, Re-energize, and Find Balance

by Gail Boorstein Grossman.

YOGA: THE PATH TO HOLISTIC HEALTH

by B.K.S. Iyengar

TEACHING YOGA: Essential Foundations and Techniques

By Mark Stephens

Please feel free to share our posts with your friends, colleagues, and favorite social media networks.

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Monday, March 21, 2022

To Assist or Not to Assist

how to assist
By Sangeetha Saran

There are various categories of students. Similarly, there are various kinds of teachers - Teachers who are over-enthusiastic and teachers who hardly pay attention. Neither is an attribute you’d want in your teacher. A teacher needs to make the right decision, which differs, for every student. No single method works on all students, teachers have to get a little creative and find a way to work out with the student in a way the student feels comfortable.





The primary and most basic function of a teacher is to teach. The assistance that a teacher provides is subject to the situation faced by the teacher and at times by the student. Assisting students is not a compulsion for any teacher, it is the teacher’s own passion that makes her assist every student that requires it. 

Assistance, therefore, is a positive attribute in a teacher. But there are two sides to every coin. Overly assisting a student may sometimes lead to a lack of confidence. Students may become way too dependent on the teacher for daily yoga practice. The component of “going with the flow” of own body will be absent. Without this yoga loses its effect on the practitioner’s body.





Overly Enthusiastic Teachers 


There are teachers who try to assist the students, in good faith of course, since they are very passionate about their profession and they try to teach the student every little step. This works fine unless it becomes a regular practice. If the teacher persists with this method, the student loses the touch of self-learning and becomes more dependent on the teacher than advisable. 

Students will need assistance more and more frequently as time passes because yoga is a process of slowly making your body carve its path into positions it wasn’t initially able to get into. The only way to do this is by carving your own path, and with minimum outside help. Sure, teachers are always there to help a student when needed, but getting comfortable with the body yourself is a task only the students can handle. It’s like; a mother can feed a child with her hands, but chewing the food has to be learned by the child on his own. Hence, avoid assisting the students beyond certain limits.



Ignorant Teachers


There are teachers who strongly believe that students can't learn yoga if they start teaching every little thing. That any assistance will hold students back from fully benefiting from yoga. These teachers are not lazy; they do this because they feel it is best for the students. But these teachers are sometimes oblivious to the ignorance they display. Students need to start slow and only then fly. Demonstration of asanas is not enough. One look is not enough for students to get the best out of their bodies. 

As repeatedly mentioned many times, yoga is a process and a slow one at that. Here is another example. When a child first starts riding a bicycle, the parent holds it from behind and then sets the childfree. If the parent does not hold the bicycle in the beginning the child might fall. This seems like an effective way of learning to some teachers, but it has some drawbacks. The child will start balancing properly only when there’s enough confidence. Hence, start assisting students when they actually need it because they will hardly ever realize this. Teachers are the experienced ones, not the students.





Teachers always take action in good faith, of course. But to find out what’s best for the students is necessary. Everybody has a different way of teaching yoga, no doubt about that. But there are things, which are common for all teachers. After all, even teachers have to learn, perpetually! Make the call, to assist or not to assist.

© Copyright – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Teaching Safe Pranayama Techniques

By Kimaya Singh, CYT 500

Pranayama - It’s just breathing, right? How much harm could a little more breathing possibly do?

You would be surprised. In some cases, we regard breathing simply as means to an end. It keeps us alive, and that is both the beginning and the end of its purpose.

On the other side of the coin, breath is a way of living. Neglecting one's breathing means a very contracted and painful existence.

There are certain ways to breathe that are very beneficial to the aspiring Yogi, and also those that will cause harm. It is vital that you teach and practice the former and not the latter. Below are three ways to practice proper breathing.




Let it be

The first and safest step is to just learn about your natural breathing rhythm. Focus on your natural inhalations and let them become longer. Do the same thing on your exhalation. Practice drawing in the breath for fifteen seconds, then letting it release for the same amount of time. Practice this until you are comfortable with it.

Nostril Breathing

There are many ways to do this, but it is best to just begin simply.

Close your eyes and inhale, allowing your lungs to completely fill. Then, take your thumb and block one nostril. Exhale. Repeat ten times. Then, do the same with the left nostril.



Bhastrika Pranayama

Also known as Bellows Breath, this one is more advanced and should only be done when the basic breathing has been mastered.

Sit comfortably and inhale while at the same time slowly raising your arms overhead. The completion of the inhalation should coincide with your arms becoming fully stretched.

Then, begin to exhale and form your hands into fists, stopping when you reach your shoulders. Complete your exhale. Repeat five times.

These three techniques will lay out a basic foundation. And like a foundation, it has to be built upon, yet can never be replaced. Always remember to practice the breath in a safe manner, never rushing through a session. Students want to hurry, so they can get to the Asana part of the practice. Remind them that breath is what makes Asana possible.

© Copyright – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

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See our testimonials to find out what our graduates have to say about our selection of online teacher certification courses. Please feel free to share our posts with your friends, colleagues, and favorite social media networks.


Thursday, June 03, 2021

Teaching Mood Elevating Yoga Classes: Bow Pose

do bow pose at home
By: Virginia Iversen M.Ed. 

As many of us know from experience, a really good workout is one of the best ways to elevate a sour mood. A well-rounded, comprehensive Yoga practice can be even more effective at elevating one’s mood, because of the emphasis on releasing tension, focusing on the positive aspects of life and opening up the entire front of the body, including the heart area. A low mood is often evidenced by rounded shoulders, a lack of “get up and go” energy and tense shoulders. Additionally, painful experiences that remain lodged in the body are often accompanied by a clenched jaw, which can result in the painful condition, temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ). 



Many different Yoga postures help to release deeply held muscular tension throughout the body. Back bending Yoga postures are particularly good at elevating one’s mood, because these poses help to open up and expand the entire front of the body, including the throat chakra area. When the front of the body is expanded, the flow of life force energy, or prana, is increased. This boost of energy helps to dispel the lethargy that so often accompanies low mood states. When the heart area is open and expanded, it is also easier to release tension in the jaw, shoulders and neck areas. 



If you are teaching Yoga to a diversity of students over the course of the week, do be aware that a number of your students may be struggling with low moods states, including feeling of helplessness and hopelessness, which are often emotional symptoms of depression. Please keep in mind that some of your Yoga students may be contending with unintegrated, painful life experiences, which are lodged in their bodies. Remember to move slowly and gently with these students and to not push them too quickly into back bending postures that they are not ready to practice. 



Even relatively simple back bending Yoga postures can be profoundly effective at releasing the physical tension that is often held around the heart, throat, neck, and shoulder areas. Another area of the body where painful or difficult life experiences are often held is the hips. In all of these areas of the body, it is important to guide your Yoga students respectfully through the practice of these postures and to remind them to slow down or take a break and rest in Child’s Pose, if they need to do so. When necessary, you also can offer your students the option of practicing restorative, supported versions of many of the traditional back bending Yoga postures, if it is more appropriate for a particular student on a given day. 

* Bow Pose or Dhanurasana

Bow Pose is a wonderfully accessible beginning back bending posture, which has an immediately expanding, energizing and mood-elevating effect. This posture is practiced from a prone position on the mat, so it is appropriate for a wide range of Yoga students. Although Bow Pose is generally regarded as a beginning to Level 1 Yoga posture, it can be quite challenging for some students if they are particularly tight throughout the front of the body. Bow Pose elongates the entire front of the torso, expands the rib cage, elongates the quadriceps, and releases tension throughout the sides of the neck, shoulders and thoracic spine.



Bow Pose is usually practiced towards the second half of a Yoga class. It is often practiced after a series of Sun Salutations, standing asanas and balancing postures, so that the students are thoroughly warmed up. When you are ready to guide your students through the practice of Dhanurasana or Bow Pose, have them flow through a final vinyasa and then come to a prone position on their Yoga mats. When they are ready, ask your students to bend their legs and grasp their ankles with their hands and to keep their palms facing the central line of the body. 



With their next inhale, ask your students to exert a gentle pressure against their hands as they raise their bent legs off the mat several inches. Ask your students to be mindful to keep their knees in a straight line with their hips, while they hold the posture for five full breaths. With their next exhale, ask your Yoga students to release Bow Pose and come back to a resting, prone position on their mats. Repeat Bow Pose two more times with your class, and then guide your students into the next Yoga posture. 



Virginia Iversen, M.Ed, has been practicing and studying the art of Yoga for over twenty years. She lives in Woodstock, New York, where she works as a writer and an academic support specialist. 

© Copyright – Virginia Iversen / Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Are you an experienced teacher looking for YACEP credits or continuing education?

Subscribe to Our Newsletter for Special Discounts and New Products

Related Resources

The YOGA MIND: 

52 Essential Principles of Yoga Philosophy to Deepen your Practice 

by Rina Jakubowicz

RESTORATIVE YOGA FOR LIFE

A Relaxing Way to De-stress, Re-energize, and Find Balance

by: Gail Boorstein Grossman

YOGA: THE PATH TO HOLISTIC HEALTH

by B.K.S. Iyengar

TEACHING YOGA: Essential Foundations and Techniques

By Mark Stephens

Want to learn more about how to become a certified yoga instructor or practicing yoga as a form of therapy? Please feel free to use the resources on the right side of this page for research.